ReachLocal: One Stop Digital Shop for Local Small Business

This video interview was originally posted on SMB Group Spotlight. 

Laurie: Hi, this is Laurie McCabe here with SMB Group’s SMB Spotlight. Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Sharon Rowlands, the relatively new CEO of ReachLocal.  Sharon was brought into ReachLocal earlier this year to help transform the company.  Sharon, thanks for talking to me today.

Sharon: Absolute pleasure Laurie.

Laurie: Great.  Before we get started can you just tell me a little bit about who ReachLocal is and how you got started and what the company does?

Sharon: Sure, absolutely.  ReachLocal was founded over 10 years ago to really help local businesses with their digital marketing needs.  It was a time when advertising dollars were still mainly going to print and Yellow Pages. As the Internet became a stronger way in which consumers looked for services, ReachLocal was established to help local businesses tap into that.

Laurie: That’s kind of hard to believe thinking back now that only 10 years ago where we were using Yellow Pages and things like that.

Sharon: Absolutely.

Laurie: So dialing forward a bit what does ReachLocal stand for today, what’s the business about today?

Sharon: The business today is still about helping local businesses get more customers. Most local businesses are small, and we are still all about helping them get found online wherever consumers are searching.  What has changed is clearly the number of places consumers search has expanded. So local businesses now have to worry about being found on search engines, found on digital directories, found on social media. Then they need to be able to manage all that digital traffic in an effective way.

Laurie: I think it’s getting more and more pressurized because there are so many channels that you have to get out through, between social media and search, and if you’re a brick and mortar company you’re still doing things in the physical world.  How do you help small businesses get their arms around this, manage it and break through the noise when you have the big companies with big budgets and more resources?

Sharon: Right.  Well, I think it’s a couple of things but firstly really being a one-stop shop for them because it’s overwhelming to think you have to manage all these different online venues. So ReachLocal does it all for the small business in one place.

We have a really amazing technology platform that optimizes across all of the platforms and makes sure that we’re actually getting you the most leads for your money.  Then secondly what we do with our ReachEdge platform, similar to a marketing automation system, we help the local business manage those leads and provide analytics around what’s working and conversion.  We have great technology but we really believe the business wants help as well–so we also bring great service and expertise to make sure their campaigns are working for them.

Laurie: Can you tell me a little bit about what would be like for a typical small business, maybe a real estate company or a dental practice, what would you do for them start to finish?

Sharon: Let me give you a real life example. I just talked the other week with a relatively new client, six months, up in the Bay Area, a plumber.  He has 10 contractors on staff.  What we did for him was we set him with our ReachEdge platform which gives him a mobile optimized website which is really important because over 50% of searches are being done by mobile, and that’s just growing.

Laurie: And that’s all integrated into the platform?

Sharon: That’s all integrated into the platform.  We then run all his advertising campaigns across digital display and search engine.  We do retargeting campaigns for him. All of the lead intake, which is both phone and web forms, come into one place, get categorized, and alerts him to how he has to follow-up and then really tracks those leads through to conversion and getting new clients.  He can really see the ROI in what his digital marketing spend is doing for him.  His performance in terms of customer growth has been incredible in the last six months.

Laurie: I think a lot of times without that automation a lot of leads and people you bring into the database they just fall through the cracks, you don’t follow up because you’re overwhelmed trying to do plumbing or whatever your business is.

Sharon: Absolutely.  You’ve really hit something really, really important.  So much of the industry talks about lead generation.  You might get a great lead but unless you follow-up and convert it it’s still been a waste of your money.  Typically small businesses, because they’re so busy on their business actually lead conversion tends to get really neglected and one of the things we’re passionate about with ReachLocal is really helping clients convert effectively, not just get them leads.

Laurie: Do you also help them manage or improve their repeat business, referral business, are there elements to that once you have a customer.  It’s not just like a one shot deal, you’re bringing them into the fold so to speak?

Sharon: Right.  Well I think we really encourage our customers to use best practices in terms of email marketing and great content.  At the end of the day content really is foundational.  They can set up lead nurturing campaigns within ReachEdge platform.  Our primary focus really is getting them customers.

Laurie: Getting them new business, which in every one of our surveys, is the number one for small business.  What do you think makes ReachLocal really stand out?  There’s a lot of competitors that are pitching similar things, what do you think makes you different especially when it comes to the smaller company?

Sharon: Okay, I think a couple of things.  Number one I think we really are a one-stop digital shop for small business. That’s very important because it’s overwhelming for them to think about dealing with different partners for different aspects of what they need.  The fact that we can deliver the full spectrum is very important.

Secondly, I we bring ten years of expertise.  We have run millions of campaigns so we know what works.  That meld of great technology but with expertise I really think delivers a really great performance and at the end of the day that’s really what matters to our customers is they want to see the results.  They’re spending very important dollars so getting the performance and the results is key.

Laurie: Speaking of dollars the other thing that’s important to them is something they can afford.  A lot of times I talk to them and oh you know it’s really affordable and I ask for pricing and well it’s about $50,000 to get started!  What’s the deal with ReachLocal, how much are they in for?

Sharon: ReachEdge, which is if you like the marketing system and platform that gives you the website and all the marketing automation tools is $299 a month.  After that, what you choose to spend on search engine and display marketing is dependent upon where you are, how many leads you need to generate. Clearly your budget is going to relate to what type of performance you’re looking to get.

 Laurie: But $299 a month is the basic fee to be using the platform, taking advantage of all the automation?

Sharon: Absolutely, and get all of the reporting and conversion tools.

Laurie: Definitely something that most small businesses have in their wheelhouse in terms of affordability. So where can a company go to learn more about ReachLocal?

Sharon: Well you can find us on the web of course, at http://www.reachlocal.com. Or you can call us at 888-644-1321. And because we are a local business supporting local businesses we actually have a presence all over the world so we have over 20 offices across America.  Typically if you’re a small business and you need somebody to come and talk to you to really help strategize with you we have somebody locally.

Laurie: That’s great.  I’m here in your local New York office right now.  Sharon, this has been a great introduction to ReachLocal, thank you very much.  Thank you all tuning in to this SMB Spotlight.

Microsoft Lumia 1520: A Millennial Perspective

A few weeks ago, Microsoft asked me if I wanted to check out the Lumia 1520. Although I’m a long-time iPhone user, I thought, why not? It’s always good to see if there is something better out there.

 Unfortunately, once I got the phone, it seemed like I never had the time to really put it through its paces. Luckily, my 20-year old son, Tyler McCabe (@tyccabe) who is entering his junior year as computer engineering major, was eager to take the Lumia on a weeklong test drive. Since he’s used both iPhones and Androids over the past few years, his take on the Lumia 1520 intrigues me and I hope to try it soon as well!

Hardware

Nokia Lumia 1520 RedThe phone is a sleek device that offers a 16.2×8.5cm screen while only weighing just over 200g. The size may be turn off for an iPhone user because it so much wider, but after carrying the phone around for a while, I felt that the trade off for a larger screen is worth the extra size.

Camera

The camera bulge on the backside was slightly annoying at first, but considering the impressive photo quality, I can deal with this annoyance. With 20 Megapixel resolution, the front camera produces staggeringly clear and detailed photos that very few smartphones I’ve seen can compete with.

Unlike the mid-resolution photos I get on the iPhone 5—which look good on a small phone screen but are grainy when viewed on a proper monitor—the Lumia’s front camera provides crisp, clean views of intricate images regardless of monitor size.

The camera program also offers amateur photographer helpful modes to help optimize picture-taking under different conditions. From bright sunny days to dark nightclubs, the Lumia’s easy to use tools helped me take great pictures to share with friends. The phone also has many built-in visual filters to make “post production” and editing on the fly easy to do well.

Integrated Circuitry and Storage

 The Snapdragon processor in the Lumia 1520 excels at providing quick and responsive feedback when using applications on the phone. For example, when clocked next to an HTC Incredible II and iPhone 5 streaming podcasts over WiFi, the Lumia began playback long before the other two had finished loading. The phone also has exceptional battery life, with a lithium-ion cell that provides me with 24 hours of phone use without a recharge.

The only major hardware gripe I have is the SD/NanoSim slots, which require a Lumia 1520 specific tool to remove and replace these critical components in the phone. What if you lose it? It proved difficult to pry open with a paperclip. Though the unibody design benefits from this choice, the overall inconvenience isn’t worth it. This design lags behind many Android designs for the same function.

Software

Though the original Windows 8.0 was the bane of desktop clients, Windows Phone 8 OS is well suited to smartphones. The Lumia 1520 comes with Windows Phone 8.1, and the user interface was surprisingly intuitive for me and I think would be even the most diehard Apple fans. Some specifics:

  • Getting started with the phone and connected to the Internet over WiFi was easy enough, taking me about five minutes.
  • The email application integrates with top email providers like Outlook, Gmail, Yahoo, and other services if the mail server information is known. Emails load quickly and the UI provides a good viewing experience.
  • I was genuinely surprised to see how concise and user friend the Microsoft Office mobile app is. It’s easy to use and the touch screen enhances, instead of inhibits, document editing.
  • You can use 3G or WiFi and the Skype app to make free calls and video calls, and to send IMs.
  • The new mobile office really shines with integration of local phone documents with Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud service. This allows users to access their files from anywhere with wireless Internet. Though not a new concept, this feature will bring users of Microsoft’s desktop office suite into the new age of cloud-based and mobile services in an intuitive way.
  • The Excel spreadsheet application offers most of the functionality of its desktop relative, giving users the ability to edit multiple cells dynamically with touch commands and analyze data with a variety of predefined and user-created functions. It also brings chart and graph creation and editing, a useful feature for those looking for quick and easy way to interpret data and share information on the go.
  • One major drawback of the new Suite is the lack of live multi-user collaboration and revision. Unlike its free competitor Google Docs, Office mobile does not offer live editing of documents between coworker. Though document storage is a step in the right direction, many users will find the lack of collaborative features a turn off for the Lumia and Windows phones.
  • A small problem with the ergonomics of the keyboard when typing on the phone in landscape mode is that due to its long body, reaching the inner row of keys can be a strain for those with smaller hands. 

Social Media

Social media is front and center on the dashboard of Windows Mobile 8.0. Unlike IOS or Android where social media apps are discrete and can only be loosely organized, the Windows main screen knits together all of your different social networks together, giving a unified and user-friendly way to manage your entire social presence with the touch of button.

Entertainment

Though work is a major focus for the Lumia, it also offers much in the way of kicking back, for example:

  • The Game store and library on the phone integrates the Xbox Live network with your local library, allowing both diehard gamers and casual players alike to share content across platforms and with friends.
  • The selection of touch-based games appeared to be quite good with favorites like Plants vs. Zombies, and Cut The Rope.
  • Many streaming video options are available right out of the box like Hulu, and AT&T Mobile Video.

Summary

Though the size of the Lumia was initially a major hurdle for me to think that I would be able to use the phone as my main mobile device, the slim ergonomics design won me over. The phone continued to impress me by combining the ease of IOS and the customizability of an Android to produce a polished introductory experience. Further complementing my favorable first impression is the creative UI and graphic design that sent a message of innovation and not that of an old “dorky” business phone (think Blackberry).

Unlike its rivals from Google and Apple, the Lumia and Windows 8 Office suite allow for native support of common business formats like PowerPoint, Word, and Excel spreadsheets. The Lumia renders these files as you’d view them on a desktop with the original aspect ratio.

Though there are a few software tweaks, as discussed above, that could improve the Office suite, the Lumia is a good choice for business people who want a cloud and mobile first approach to applications.

Overall I was quite pleasantly surprised with the week I spent with the 1520, and would consider it a fitting, and possibly even superior option for anyone looking for a new approach in the smartphone market.

How Would You Like to Pay For That? Let the Customer Decide!

baroquon_Add_MoneyA couple of weeks ago, I had the opportunity to present on the topic of key trends in payments and commerce at Sage Summit 2014, Sage North America’s annual customer and partner event. Since getting paid is a top priority for all businesses, the topic garnered quite a bit of interest from small and medium business attendees.

So, I thought I’d share presentation highlights in this post, which discusses the sea change underway when it comes to how people want to shop and transact business, and why it is driving the need for businesses to reframe how they think about payments.

View the presentation above to learn about:

  • Key trends in payments and commerce, including ecommerce, mobile commerce, social shopping, omnicommerce and new types of forms of payments and currencies.
  • What this means for you as an SMB decision maker, and why flexibility and integrating payments with financials and other business systems will become critically important.
  • What you need to think about and plan for in this area, and why taking a more strategic view of payments and help you attract more customers and grow revenues.

And please let me know what you think about this topic! What other trends are you seeing, and how are you thinking about them in terms of your business?

What Is Workforce Science, and How Can It Help Your Business?

 

Smarter workforceEngaged, motivated employees can be an organization’s greatest asset. When employees are fully involved in, committed to, and passionate about their work, productivity rises, and more employees are likely to become brand advocates who can help you grow the business.

But many factors come into play when it comes to developing a more engaged workforce. While talent management tools are important to helping you attract, energize and retain the best employees, it’s only part of the picture.

In the last post in this three-part series, sponsored by IBM Smarter Workforce, I look at how companies are using applicant tracking systems (ATS) and assessment solutions to better address these issues, and new developments in this area that promise to provide further enhancements.

Why Should Companies Care About Workforce Science?

Intuitively, we all know that employees can make or break a company. When employees are productive and dedicated, they can propel business growth. Conversely, disgruntled or even apathetic employees can grind business growth to a halt.

Research confirms this intuition is spot on. IBM has found a strong correlation between employee engagement at the business unit level and key performance indicators, including customer metrics such as higher profitability, productivity, and quality, as well as lower employee turnover, absenteeism, theft and safety incidents.

But how much do most businesses really know about their employees? While many organizations are going to great lengths to understand and analyze customer and prospect expectations, most don’t really know much about what makes their employees tick. For instance, how does a person prefer to learn? What are their talents? How much do they care about their jobs?

The truth is that most companies still use subjective criteria to make many decisions in this area. For instance:

  • Only 56% of companies use an assessment as part of the hiring process. (Aberdeen)
  • 77% of HR professionals worldwide do not know how its workforce potential is affecting the company’s bottom line1 and less than half of organizations surveyed use objective talent data to drive business decisions.(SHL)
  • 86 percent of companies say they have no analytics capabilities in the HR function. Moreover, 67 percent rate themselves as “weak” at using HR data to predict workforce performance and improvement.(Bersin by Deloitte)

When you consider that businesses and their employees basically share a two-way profit relationship, it’s hard to understand why companies have been so slow to focus on this problem.

How Workforce Science Improves Talent ROI

talent lifeccyleWorkforce science helps businesses solve for this by combing behavioral science with normative data, analytics, consulting, and processes to determine what it takes to build an engaged workforce, and create the “systems of engagement” to execute on it.

Particularly as the recession wanes and the economy picks up, more companies are starting to get interested in improving their effectiveness through workforce science. With the competition for top talent intensifying, organizations are looking to use the predictive powers of workforce science to help ensure that their investments will pay off throughout the talent management life cycle.

For instance:

  • Predictive hiring. By looking for patterns across organizational, unit, HR, and external data, companies can hire more top performers by identifying the talents and skills that are critical to high performance in different areas, and creating a process to hire candidates that most closely align with these characteristics. In addition, analytics are also used to determine what characteristics are a better cultural fit with the company, so you can more readily identify candidates who will fit, be more productive, and who are more likely to stay with the company for a longer time period.
  • Predictive workforce readiness.To close talent gaps today, and develop the talent you need for tomorrow, you need to be able to accurately identify the talent you have, and take steps to fill the gaps. This starts with mapping talent requirements to key strategic objectives, identifying linkages between organizational roles and key competencies, assessing employee competencies, and determining what hiring, training, or actions you need to take to close the gaps. For example, a company may determine that the existing workforce supplies the electrical engineering competencies they need today, but much of the talent is concentrated in the baby boomer age group, and they will face a deficit in 5 years as these boomers retire. With data-based analysis, the company can take proactive steps well in advance to fill the gap.
  • Predictive retention. All companies want to reduce employee turnover costs. Being able to anticipate why top performers might leave, and taking action to stop it can help you reduce these costs. But how well do you really understand what’s causing employee attrition? For instance, a media company believed that long commutes were the key reason for high turnover in its administrative ranks. However, analysis showed that employee family obligations, such as caring for children or aging parents, was a much more important reason. By determining the real case instead of relying on a hunch, the company could take the right corrective actions to reduce turnover.

Perspective

Talent is the lifeblood of any organization, fueling the innovation required to grow and thrive in today’s hyper-competitive world. The truth is, however, that most companies are just starting to think about putting science, solutions and processes in place in this area.

Because taking this type of analytical, data-driven approach to talent management is so new, most companies will want to keep the following in mind:

  • Start with the basics. It is probably overwhelming to even think about standardizing your existing human resources data, bringing in normative data and applying new tools and processes on a corporate basis. Start by focusing on a few key problems, such as a skills gap you know exists but can’t quantify, or figuring out why turnover in a key function is too high.
  • Bring real people into the process. Don’t get so carried away with the science that you forget to talk to people in the trenches upfront in the process. This will help ensure that you are not overlooking any possibilities, and are testing the right hypotheses when you do apply analytical tools.
  • Keep the big picture in focus. Although it’s often necessaryand even advantageousto start small, continually reassess how more accurate insights into your human resources and talent information can help you improve business performance.
  • Find a vendor you trust to help guide you. Although this is still a relatively new area, best practices are emerging. Vendors with deep expertise and experience can help you avoid pitfalls and accomplish your goals more quickly and effectively.

IBM’s workforce science solutions combine 25 years of behavioral expertise, analytics and talent management solutions with the largest content library and normative database in the human capital industry. To learn more, visit http://www.ibm.com/smarterworkforce.

This is the third and final post in a three-part blog series written by SMB Group and sponsored by IBM. The series examines talent management solutions and trends.

 

Worms and Trojans and Snorts—Oh My! Perspectives on Dell’s 1-5-10 Security Discussion

digital securityLast week, I had the opportunity to join Dell’s 1-5-10 security panel discussion. This was the first in a series of small group events hosted by Dell to consider security trends and implications over the next one, five and ten years. Session attendees included Dell security experts, customers, partners, press and analysts. We discussed what small and medium businesses (SMBs) should be thinking about as they prepare for the future, and what vendors need to do to help them more easily secure their businesses.

Verna Grace Chao, director, Dell global security solutions, kicked off the session by asking us for our favorite security terms. The sheer magnitude of cyber-security issues and risks quickly bubbled up as people reeled off terms such as honeypot, snort, worms, hijack, Trojan, trampoline, phishing and ransomwear and more. I couldn’t help but think how difficult it is for business decision-makers to understand what all these terms mean, let alone stay ahead of threats and safeguard corporate information.

Of course, this challenge is even more daunting for small and medium businesses (SMBs) that lack internal expertise in this area. SMB Group research indicates that on average, only 19% of businesses with less than 100 employees have full-time, dedicated IT staff, and 27% have “no IT support” at all. Meanwhile, although 86% of medium businesses have dedicated IT staff, these resources are likely to be IT generalists, not security experts. As Michael Gray, Director, Thrive Networks, an IT solutions provider owned by Staples said, “there aren’t chief security officers in SMB.” So, despite mounting security risks and their increased reliance on the Internet and technology to run their businesses, many SMBs are under-prepared to deal with today’s threats, let alone those that the Internet of things (IoT) will usher in tomorrow.

Security Steps To Take Today

stepsFor many SMBs, the first step is to become more security aware. The Internet, mobile, cloud, social and other technologies provide many great business benefits. But they also open the door to more vulnerabilities. Too often, digital convenience trumps security, and SMBs choose not to see themselves as potential cyber-targets. Even worse, ITIC survey data shows 35% of firms don’t know if or when BYOD mobile devices have been hacked! Obviously, if you don’t know you have a problem, you can’t fix it.

According to ITIC, hacking is the #1 type of breach, representing more than 25% of all breaches recorded in 2013. Sub-contractor (14%), mobile (13%), insider malfeasance (12%) and employee error (9%) followed. In all, these breached exposed a whopping 91,978,932 records.

Without strong security measures in place, many SMBs are easy targets for hackers. And, because SMBs are often digitally connected to larger business partners, they are increasingly attractive targets. Hackers can potentially not only gain entrée to the SMB’s data, but also gain access to data of the SMB’s bigger partners.

Panelists agreed that if you haven’t yet done so, now is the time to conduct a security audit to determine what potential vulnerabilities pose the biggest financial and brand threats to the business. A solid plan incorporates both measures to prevent breaches from occurring in the first place, and those to detect, prevent and respond to incidents when they do occur.

Business owners and stakeholders need to take a more active role in this process, as Brett Hansen, executive director, Dell Client Solutions Software, explained. The security discussion needs to move from being a tech-only discussion to one where business stakeholders help identify, quantify and prioritize critical business vulnerabilities.

Since SMBs often lack the internal resources required to plan and implement the right level of security, they are increasingly turning to managed service providers (MSPs) for security expertise. A good MSP can help you get a better handle on what vulnerabilities could trigger disruptions, what the impact would be on the business, and develop a risk management plan that aligns with your business requirements and budgets. MSPs can help make security a solvable challenge instead of mind-boggling, unsolvable one. While you can’t eliminate every risk, you can close off the biggest vulnerabilities for your business—and gain peace of mind. Some of the basic measures to take include data encryption; data containerization for BYOD devices (meaning that personal and corporate data are securely separated); and securing the perimeter from unauthorized access.

Looking Ahead

telescopeTrends such as wearables, smart homes and smart cars are exciting and offer many benefits to businesses. But, they will also unleash new security vulnerabilities, especially as more devices and information become interconnected. Jon Ramsey, Dell fellow and CTO, Dell SecureWorks, commented that as cyber and physical domains continue to merge, the risk equation also changes substantially, and will require an expansion of single sign-on to help safeguard all aspects of our digital lives. Participants agreed that these trends will require a shift in the security mindset. Some of the changes forecast include that security solutions will:

  • Move beyond protecting data where it resides, to protecting data dynamically, wherever it goes.
  • Proactively account for the “human factor.” As security issues increase and become more diverse and complex, they need to become more contextual to make it easier for us humans to do the right thing. Biometrics, from eyeball to touch to even genome identification were mentioned as possibilities in this area. As Patrick Sweeneyexecutive director, Dell SonicWALL mentioned, security solutions should act more like more like an airbag than a seatbelt.
  • Become more adaptive, with capabilities to generate new defenses proactively as new threats emerge. According to Ramsey, “Every threat starts out as an unknown threat, we need to expose it and make it known to defend against it.” Risk analysis risk analysis engines will need to look further beyond individual events to act more proactively to accomplish this.              

Perspective

The good news is that in the future, security solutions are likely to be more adaptive, less dependent on humans to make them work, and more capable of proactively eliminating threats. However, far too many SMBs are falling short even when it comes to many security basics—such as encryption, containerization and perimeter security—leaving them far too susceptible to negative business consequences.

Cyber-security threats may seem endless, insurmountable and even unlikely to many SMB decision-makers. But this session underscored that while we can never eliminate all possible breaches, SMBs should be seeking out the solutions and expertise they need now to get the basics in place for today and to help them prepare for tomorrow.

International Game Technology: Winning At The Talent Recruitment Game

Smarter workforceWhether a business is large or small, identifying, qualifying and hiring the right employees is critical to innovation and growth. But, as the recession wanes and the economy picks up, more companies are hiring, and competitionespecially for top talentis intensifying. This makes it more difficult for many companies to find the talent they need to thrive.

At the same time, options to help identify and hire candidates are expanding. For instance, employee referrals, advocacy programs, social media and mobile apps are becoming more important recruitment tools, while the role of external recruiting vendors is diminishing. While these new recruitment channels can help companies access a broader applicant pool, it’s not easy to use, integrate and optimize across them.

As a result, many businesses are reassessing and refreshing their existing recruiting practices and solutions. They are looking for knowledge and tools to give them the agility they need to compete more successfully throughout the recruitment process. .

In this three-part series, sponsored by IBM Smarter Workforce, I look at how companies are using applicant tracking systems (ATS) and assessment solutions to better address these issues, and new developments in this area that promise to provide further enhancements.

International Game Technology: Fueling Growth With Talent

HomepageHeroBanner_JurassicParkHeadquartered in Las Vegas, 34-year old International Game Technology (IGT) is the leading manufacturer of gaming machines. From Las Vegas to Monte Carlo, from Wheel of Fortune to James Cameron’s AVATAR, chances are you’ve played a video slots game on an IGT machine.

While IGT has been the long-time market leader, it does not rest on its laurels. In 2011, the company introduced IGT Cloud, an industry-first which lets casino operators dynamically deploy game content across multiple properties to optimize floor efficiencies, and also offer a seamless gaming experience across land-based, mobile and online devices. In 2012 IGT acquired Double Down Interactive LLC, a social gaming company and developer of DoubleDown Casino on Facebook, to fuel IGT’s expansion through new media. In 2013, IGT partnered with Casino Del Sol in Arizona to hold the AZ, to hold the Game King Championship, the first cross-platform video poker tournamentand the largest in the world, with more than 360,000 players.

To sustain this pace of growth and innovation, IGT must be able to identify and attract top talent.

Keeping Up With IGT Talent Requirements

Talent management solutions are still relatively new. Up until 2000, IGT had—like most companiesrelied on newspaper ads and human resources business partners for candidate recruitment. People would stop in to drop off hard copy applications, and everything was stored in physical file cabinets.

In 2000, IGT started using BrassRing’s cloud-based applicant tracking system. While the solution worked well, as the company grew, they needed more capabilities in the talent management area. When Laura Callender joined IGT six years ago as HRIS Staff Analyst, her job was to refresh and revamp talent management systems at the company to ensure IGT would be able to attract and retain top talent.

IGT’s first priority was to revamp the BrassRing ATS (which is now part of the IBM Kenexa Talent Suite) to keep pace with the company’s expanding global operations and hiring requirements. According to Callender, “It’s very easy to get wrapped up in the day-to-day, and neglect new features. But it’s important to keep re-evaluating business needs and figure out what will really help improve the process.”

Callender took a fresh look at things, and extended the system to support IGT’s growing geographical footprint, and provide Chinese and Spanish language capabilities. She also added other capabilities, such as mobile functionality. “So many things that are cutting edge, like enabling mobile job applicants…five years ago, people wouldn’t have dreamed of job hunting and applying on a mobile phone. But now applicants might be at the dentist’s office and want to apply. We need to enable these new capabilities that will make a difference to our business,” says Callender.

Community and Support Are Key to Success

men with puzzle piecesIGT has found IBM’s “Kenexans” and the community of Smarter Workforce users invaluable in helping her figure out what changes will provide the most value to IGT. “IBM’s Kenexans help us stay ahead of these trends…they focus on helping us improve the way we do things and help us figure out what options will give us the biggest bang for the buck. Should we turn features on or off? What should we do differently? And how can we make things seamless for our users? So many things are cool, but what will we get the most value from?” observes Callender.

IBM’s Smarter Workforce Global Support Center helps IGT prioritize enhancements via an annual review. As important, IGT can call on their services as needed, not only for break/fix issues, but for new project tickets, and to get the “hand-holding” required to implement new functionality. “We’re in the middle in terms of what we need to implement, and they are there when we need them to help with the next step. It’s a closer degree of support than we get from other vendors,” notes Callender. “Out of all the vendors, in terms of support, I would choose IBM Kenexa any day.”

Callender is very active in user groups as well, which helps her learn from what others are doing, and what’s worked and what hasn’t for them. She’s attended six global conferences, and participated in user groups at all of them. As Callender puts it, “The user groups have really grown, from 30 to 40 attendees to over 100 at the last one. We don’t have an army of HR and IT people, but I can talk to users that do, like Pepsico, Time Warner and Disney, that we can really learn from. At the same time, there are companies smaller than uswith just 100 or 200 employeesthat we can help. It’s a really good way to exchange knowledge.”

The user groups also help facilitate conversations between the IBM Kenexa team and users. “We talk, and they listen. We sit in a roundtable, it’s very interactive, with experts and R&D engineers at each table to discuss topics such as referrals, triggers, etc. It’s very helpful and they act on our input.”

Getting Results

Since IBM Kenexa BrassRing is cloud based, upgrades are “very easy,” says Callender. “IBM rolls them out and turns them on. Some things you have a choice to upgrade or not. But they never break anything with an upgrade, which has happened with some of the other cloud solutions we use.”

Today, IGT hiring managers, external recruiters and applicants are all using the system. Last year, IGT used BrassRing to hire about 600 employees for mostly technical positions, with an average of about 50 applicants for each position. IGT has integrated BrassRing ATS with its SAP ERP system, so that when someone is hired, they are automatically moved from BrassRing to SAP. “Instead of having a person digging through emails to find candidates, ATS can do this for us much faster and more effectively with Boolean searches, and tagging,” states Callender.

IBM Kenexa’s BrassRing ATS also helps IGT answer important questions that impact recruitment strategy, such as:

  • What is the tipping point for the number of applicants for a certain position?
  • How can we do a fill requisitions more quickly?
  • What’s the best way to deal with counteroffers, or higher rejection rates?
  • How can we recruit people that aren’t currently looking for a job?

“We get our money’s worth from BrassRing ATS. We don’t have a formal measurement system, but we know we are saving a lot of time, which saves us money. There is no way we could function without it.” In addition, BrassRing pricing is based on the number of requisitions and applicants, so “what we pay for it aligns with our actual use, which we appreciate,” explains Callender.

Perspective

Talent is the lifeblood of any organization, fueling the innovation required to grow and thrive in today’s hyper-competitive world. Many cloud-based ATS solutions available, but as the IGT story illustrates, it’s not just the nuts and bolts of the software that matter. Being part of an active, engaged vendor support and user community can help you to:

  1. Map out a more effective strategy. Look for vendors and user communities that are collaborative, and can help you assess your requirements and how they are likely to evolve, and provide you with scalable solutions that you can deploy in an incremental manner.
  2. Get things right the first time. Your company benefits when the vendor facilitates knowledge sharing of best practices for things such as reporting considerations, workflow and underlying database structure that will take the most time and pain out of different processes. For instance, how do you set things up so applicants don’t need to fill out a new affirmative action form every time they apply for a new job, but can just edit information they’ve previously entered?
  3. Prioritize next steps. Your business is constantly evolving, and so is the hiring environment. But few organizations can do everything. Strategic prioritization is essential to figure out what new functionality will provide the most value.

The world of recruitment and talent management is changing quickly. This sets the stage for not only selecting the company and solution that best fits your immediate needs, but one that will provide a strong support experience to help you gain the best outcomes as your business and the recruitment landscape evolve.

This is the first post in a three-part blog series written by SMB Group and sponsored by IBM. The series examines talent management solutions and trends.

Mobility Perspectives from Intel’s 2014 Solutions Summit

I recently had the opportunity to moderate a panel discussion at the 2014 Intel Solutions Summit with panelists Bob Moore, Founder, RJM Strategies LLC; Jeffrey R Zavaleta, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Graphium Health, an integrated, mobile electronic medical records (EMR) platform; and Dave Bucholz, Director of Enterprise Client Strategy, Business Client Platform Division at Intel. We chatted about how companies are adopting and using mobile solutions in their businesses, and some of the challenges they face.

Our conversation was very interesting, as mobile is one the fastest growing technology trends in small and medium business (SMB). Because mobile devices and apps are so user-friendly, SMBs can deploy them quickly. As a result, mobile solutions are quickly revolutionizing how SMBs get work done. In fact, 91% of SMBs already use mobile solutions in their businesses, according to 2013 SMB Mobile Solutions Study, and 67% of SMBs indicate that “mobile solutions are now critical for our business,” as shown on Figure 1.

2013 SMB Attitudes re Mobile (1)Figure 1: SMB Attitudes About Mobile Solutions

As we discussed during the panel, SMBs understand that mobile solutions not only help improve employee productivity, but also enable them to improve customer experiences and fuel business growth. In fact, 70% see mobile apps as a “complement to current business applications”, and 55% think that mobile will replace some of their existing business applications.

So it’s not surprising that mobile solutions are gobbling up a growing share of SMB technology budgets. SMBs currently spend about 11% to 20% of their technology budgets in the mobile space, and 68% expect they will need to spend more on mobile solutions next year.

However, panelists also agreed the rapid and explosive growth of and reliance on mobile solutions has caught many SMBs off-guard, resulting in some key challenges, as we also found in our study (Figure 2).

2013 top mobile challengesFigure 2:  Top Challenges to Using Mobile Solutions

SMBs often find it difficult to manage the growing plethora of mobile apps for employees, especially as SMB adoption of “bring your own device” (BYOD) policies for employees doubling over the past year to 62%. SMBs also have more customer-facing mobile apps and mobile-friendly websites to manage as well.

With adoption of and reliance on mobile solutions rising, SMBs are looking for management solutions to help them to:

  • Remotely install, update and remove managed apps from devices.
  • Track and view installed/approved/blacklisted apps at the user/device level.
  • Authenticate, manage and deploy apps based on user groups/roles and restrict content access.

Security concerns are behind many of these requirements. SMBs want solutions that enable them to:

  • Lock devices when devices are lost or stolen, or the employee leaves the company
  • Provide data encryption on devices
  • Partition/separate business-related data apps from personal data and apps

In addition, rising adoption of mobile payments and other apps that collect personal information is spiking SMB security concerns on the external app side as well.

Perspective

SMBs look at mobile solutions and like the value that see from them. Consequently, they plan to increase investments both for employee apps, and for external-facing mobile websites and mobile apps.

At the same time, BYOD shows no signs of abating. Employees want to use the devices that they’re most comfortable with, and some SMBs view BYOD a way to trim voice and data service costs. But at the same time, BYOD ushers in additional security and management challenges that can result in added costs can change this equation.

As our panelists discussed, this means that SMBs need to be more strategic upfront about using mobile in their businesses. Think not only about the devices and apps you want to use, but who will use them. Consider both the business outcomes you need from mobile solutions–and the management capabilities you’ll need to have to safeguard corporate and customer information.

Mobile management, security, and consulting services spending categories will see significant spending increases as SMBs endeavor to reap more value from and do a better job managing an increasingly complex assortment mobile devices, services and solutions. Given that many SMBs lack adequate IT resources and mobile expertise, we expect that they will increasingly turn to external solutions providers to get the management job done.

For more commentary on this, see the follow-up video interview.

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