SAP’s 5 + 1 Strategy to Build SMB Consideration and Adoption of Business One

SAP logoWhen it comes to business management and  enterprise resource planning (ERP) solutions, SAP often isn’t on the radar for small and medium businesses (SMBs). But, while the ERP giant is best known for its large enterprise solutions, SAP Business One is aimed squarely at providing small businesses with a unified business management solution.

In this three-part series, I interview Luis Murguia, who was recently appointed Senior VP and general manager for SAP Business One to discuss how the solution fits into SAP’s strategy, and what makes it a good fit for SMBs.

In this third and final post, Luis talks about SAP’s plans to accelerate consideration and adoption of Business One.

Laurie: Luis, you’re still relatively new to your Business One role. But looking out over the next year or so, what are your goals, and how will you measure success?

pillarsLuis: When I joined the team, we put a plan in place called five-plus-one priorities. Why five-plus-one, why not six? Because this one is very special, so we have five pillars, and one overall priority that is common across all five pillars. The five pillars include:

  1. Continuing to optimize Business One for the cloud is number one. Right now we offer a multi-tenant environment, we want to be able to scale that to serve tens if not hundreds of thousands of customers.
  2. Number two is speeding adoption of the HANA database among Business One customers. HANA provides an incredible source of innovation, helping customers to run much faster in real time.
  3. The third pillar is to accelerate two-tier ERP adoption. Business One is used not only by small businesses, but also in larger companies who use SAP Business Suite at corporate, and use Business One for operations in divisions and subsidiaries.
  4. Fourth is simplification. We are aggressively pursuing simplification if all of our processes. In July we are on target to reduce the number of products on our price list by 70%, to make it easier for our partners and customers to select and configure Business One
  5. The fifth pillar is to raise the dial in terms of volume and building mindshare among small businesses. Our Business One customers are small and maybe not well known, but they are on social media promoting their success so other small businesses can see the value of it.

So those are the five pillars. The plus one is very dear to my heart; I call it people, talent and diversity. Business One will be as good as the people we have working on it. We’re investing a lot of effort in terms of training, developing career paths, and helping employees continually find more challenging more interesting areas to work in to help them grow as individuals and as professionals. So that’s the core pillar that will make Business One stronger. As I said, Business One will be as strong as the people that are a part of the business.

Laurie: That’s very key, but is often not given enough airtime. If your employees are engaged and motivated and able to keep up with new skills, you’re much more likely to get good results! I think you’re right that it’s the glue.

Luis thank you so much, for painting a picture of Business One for us, where it is today, and where you want to take it.

This is the final post in a three-part series examining SAP’s Business One strategy and directions.

Are You Keeping Pace With Your SMB Customers?

The good news for tech vendors: SMBs are bullish on their own growth, and on using technology to help achieve that growth. The bad news: tech vendors may not be doing a good enough job helping SMBs understand, evaluate and buy the tech solutions that will best help their businesses.

SMB Group recently completed our 2015 SMB Routes to Market Study, which provides an in-depth look at U.S. SMB (small businesses: 1-99 employees, medium business: 100-999 employees) technology adoption, the decision-making process, and the buying cycle. Among the findings, we learned that “figuring out how different technology solutions can help my business” is the number one technology challenge for small businesses, and the number three challenge for medium businesses.

Figure 1: Top Three Technology Challenges for SMBs

Slide2

SMBs need tech vendors to provide them with a more informative, consistent purchasing experience to help them punch through the confusions knothole. Though the priority rankings differ a bit between small and medium businesses, the top two asks for both small and medium businesses are for vendors to provide a consistent experience across online, mobile, offline and other channels and to more clearly articulate how the solution helps improve specific business goals. Number three for small businesses is the desire fro better real-time online chat/phone support to answer questions, while for medium businesses, its help in connecting with reference customers with similar needs.

Figure 2: Top Ways Tech Vendors Can Improve the SMB Purchasing Experience

Slide3

The “SMB market” has always been a tough nut to crack as it actually comprises many different diverse markets. In addition to standard employee size and industry segmentation, SMBs vary widely in terms of business maturity, attitudes about technology, and a host of other variables. Furthermore, it’s a very volatile market: about 50% of new businesses fail within the first five years.

Today, these age-old challenges are compounded by the fact that the digital, social and mobile revolution raising SMB buyers’ expectations of tech vendors’ across solutions, marketing, sales add service.

As competition for SMB mindshare and market share continues to rise, tech vendors will need to work smarter to earn SMB dollars. Vendors need to do a better job of understanding the intricacies of the SMB market so that they can personalize content to nurture buyers along the their journey, providing them with an informative, helpful and consistent purchasing and service experience across channels.

Please contact Lisa Lincoln at (508) 734-5658 or lisa.lincoln70@smb-gr.com for more information about the 2015 SMB Routes to Market Study (including a Table of Contents), or to order.

 

Taking the Plunge: Triggers for Small Businesses to Move to SAP Business One

SAP logoWhen it comes to business management and  enterprise resource planning (ERP) solutions, SAP often isn’t on the radar for small and medium businesses (SMBs). But, while the ERP giant is best known for its large enterprise solutions, SAP Business One is aimed squarely at providing small businesses with a unified business management solution.

In this three-part series, I interview Luis Murguia, who was recently appointed Senior VP and general manager for SAP Business One to discuss how the solution fits into SAP’s strategy, what makes it a good fit for SMBs, and how the vendor plans to move Business One from being one of SAP’s best kept secret onto SMB short lists for ERP solutions.

In this second post, we talk about the triggers that motivate small businesses to move from entry-level accounting to SAP Business One, and how SAP and its partners help them take the leap.

Laurie: So, SAP Business One provides small businesses with more of their industry-specific needs already configured right out of the gate, and getting it in a cloud model means they don’t have to worry about installing hardware and software. But just the thought of moving from an entry-level or lower end accounting to a more robust ERP system can be very intimidating for smaller companies. So what triggers do you see motivating them to finally take the plunge and move up?


bandaidLuis:
I think a lot of us in most aspects of life; we tend to keep putting Band-Aids on pain. But finally someone says I can’t keep putting on the Band-Aids on this, I need something more comprehensive to manage my business with? I remember the story of the largest manufacturer of white boxes, white label PCs in Brazil. They were very successful in selling to schools, and any place that needed a large number of PCs because they were very price competitive. What triggered ERP adoption for them was the day they delivered the wrong PC configuration to a big customer. They lost a fortune scrambling to produce another batch, and they also realized that they almost lost one of their most important customers because of contractual requirements and remedial penalties.

Laurie: Ouch.

Luis: They were trying to do all this with manual processes and Excel files. But when you are using a lot of Excel files that need to be aligned and synchronized. In this case, they only needed one disconnect to get massive mistakes with the customer’s configuration. So they realized they had to bite the bullet and get their house in order to be much more operationally efficient.

Laurie: Okay, so how do SAP and its partners help small businesses avoid pitfalls when they’re ready to take this leap and implement Business One?

Luis: Well, some of our most successful US partners insist new customers pass a week of product training before they implement Business Because when end-users feel comfortable with the application, this helps guide the implementation and ensures users get value from it right away. So attention to end-user training is really making the difference when it comes to successful implementation.

This post is the second of a three-part series. In the third, we’ll explore SAP’s Business One strategy and goals for the future. 

Yes, Virginia, SAP Does Have a Real Small Business ERP Solution

SAP logoWhen it comes to business management and  enterprise resource planning (ERP) solutions, SAP often isn’t on the radar for small and medium businesses (SMBs). But, while the ERP giant is best known for its large enterprise solutions, SAP Business One is aimed squarely at providing small businesses with a unified business management solution.

In this three-part series, I interview Luis Murguia, who was recently appointed Senior VP and general manager for SAP Business One to discuss how the solution fits into SAP’s strategy, what makes it a good fit for SMBs, and how the vendor plans to move Business One from being one of SAP’s best kept secret onto SMB short lists for ERP solutions.

In this first post, we discuss Luis’ background, Business One history, and some of the key differentiators it has in the SMB ERP market.

Laurie:  Hi this is Laurie McCabe from SMB Group and today I’m talking to Luis Murguia, Senior VP and general manager for SAP Business One. Business One is SAP’s flagship ERP solution for small and medium businesses. So Luis you’re relatively new in this role, can you tell us a little bit about where you come from, and why you decided to become part of the Business One team at SAP.

luisLuis: Thank you Laurie, and great to catch up. I’ve been with SAP for 9 years, in the enterprise division as well as the partner organization. For the past 6 years, I ran SAP’s European partner organization. Throughout my career I have been involved with the ERP market. I started my career in providing ERP solutions for small wholesale food distributors, working with solutions like Peachtree, QuickBooks. Then I moved into selling HP3000 servers pre-loaded with business management software. So I’ve been involved in helping small business find new ways better ways to run the business and be more successful throughout my career.

Laurie: It sounds like you have a well-rounded history and in terms of small business solutions, which brings me to my next question. Many people think of SAP primarily as a big company a big company that sells sophisticated, high-end business solutions to other big companies. So what’s SAP’s role in small business?

Luis: Great question. Ben Horowitz, a venture capitalist that I admire a lot, was also a CEO of a start-up that became very successful in the dot-com crisis. He describes innovation as a really good idea that initially looks like a bad idea. This because any good idea that looks good off the bat is probably not innovative, as it s likely that many people are already doing it. For example manufacturing a car is a good idea because people need cars, but everybody knows it.

Laurie: So unless you’re like Tesla it’s not necessarily a new idea.

Luis:  Exactly. 10 years ago people thought the idea of making a high performance car that runs 100% on electricity was such bad idea was no one was doing it. But then Tesla did it. Likewise, Business One, which is designed for small businesses, doesn’t appear to be a fit for SAP. But actually, we can leverage many SAP strengths, including industry knowledge and best practices, such as order to cash, and package it for small business. That’s what makes Business One such a novel and successful product. We instill and capture expertise from SAP’s big business ERP to help our smaller business customers be more competitive.

Laurie: Ok, explain a bit of the Business One history for us.

Luis: Business One has about 50,000 customers. The solution has been available for the last 15 years, and we are accelerating growth, adding close to 1500 new customers every quarter. Every day, about 15 new companies in the world choose Business One to manage the business.

Laurie: Why do you think growth is accelerating now?

diversityLuis: I’ve been with Business One for just about four months, and I see two great takeaways to date. Number one is that Business One can be run in the customer’s own facilities, as well as in the cloud. Businesses like having this choice. The second reason, and perhaps more important, it is that more customers are choosing Business One because of the in-depth industry functionality that has been developed by our partner ecosystem.

Laurie: So is the focus for Business One to differentiate with industry specific versions or customizations?

Luis: That is 100% correct. And let’s talk a little bit about customer size segmentation too. We divide the Business One market into three distinct segments: companies with less than 50 employees, those with between 50-200 employees, and ones with 200 to 1,000 employees. The first, businesses with less than 50 employees will usually be running QuickBooks, as a standard off the shelf solution. In the 50 to 200 employee category, companies are probably using Microsoft Dynamics, Sage or another solution that they’ve customized to some extent, but they don’t have the critical mass to afford systems integrators to meet all of their requirements. Business One really fits the bill here, because we have over 600 micro-vertical customizations.

Laurie: So Business One has become a software development platform?

Luis: Yes, standard accounting, standard invoicing, management, sales, taxes, and other functionality is in there, and the ISV can build specific micro-vertical functionality on top of it–say for photo copier dealers or microbreweries, which have very different requirements. And in that 50-200 employee segment, that’s exactly what they need, a full solution to manage unique requirements, off the shelf. They can derive more value from a complete micro-vertical solution with Business One as the foundation.

Laurie: And having it available in the cloud probably helps a lot too.

Luis: Yes, in the US, over 85% of all new Business One customers are choosing cloud deployments. Many sign a contract a perpetual license from SAP for financial reasons, because most will stick with an ERP solution for a long time. It is much better, just like its better to own the house than renting the house–the math says you should buy not rent. But they are having partners run and manage Business One for them in the cloud. Say you are a microbrewery in Chicago. You don’t worry about servers, disasters or backups; you eliminate the traditional headaches associated with IT infrastructure. So even though many buy a perpetual license, all the infrastructure and management is in the cloud.

This post is the first of a three-part series. In the second, we’ll examine key triggers and requirements that drive small businesses to move from entry-level accounting solutions to SAP Business One. In the third, we’ll explore SAP’s Business One strategy and goals for the future. 

SMB Spotlight: Empowering A Billion Women by 2020 Teams Up With Xero

canstockphoto13589024Hi, this is Laurie McCabe from the SMB Group. Today, I’m talking to Ingrid Vanderveldt, CEO of a new venture called Empowering a Billion Women by 2020 (EBW2020) and with Russ Fujioka, the U.S. President of Xero, which provides cloud-based financial solutions for small businesses.

Ingrid and Russ, I’m really excited to talk to you about how you guys are teaming up on this initiative of Empowering a Billion Women by 2020.

Ingrid, can you just start by telling me a little about what EBW2020 is and why you started it?

Ingrid: Sure, and I’m so glad Russ is here, too, because I cannot imagine doing the venture without Russ and without Xero.

EBW2020 is about actually empowering a billion women on a global basis worldwide over the next few years, by providing them tools, technology, and resources to empower their success as leaders and as entrepreneurs.

To do that we focus on three areas. One is mentorship, because we found that lack of mentorship is the number one reason why women don’t start, grow, or scale their ventures. Financial literacy is number two, and number three is technology support.

These three pieces together are sometimes the most intimidating pieces of starting, growing, and scaling a business. We want to demystify that entire process, make it super easy, and provide support for women globally to tackle these three areas.

xeroIt ties into Xero on the financial side. We want and encourage women to get on the Xero platform. We’ve selected Xero because, frankly, Xero is the easiest, simplest. They call themselves beautiful accounting software, but it truly is a very easy way for any business owner to gain control and clarity and simplicity over their finances.

And when you team women up with that capability along with support, together we can help strategize on how can you use your financial literacy to empower your growth.

Laurie: In addition to Xero, what other components are in EBW2020?

Ingrid: It entails three things. One is the mentor-matching platform, where we team women business owners coming into the EBW2020 platform with a mentor by industry, by revenue numbers. So, for example, we’d team a woman making $50,000 a year with a woman in $150,000-$250,000 a year category. That’s all free.

Then, we start moving them into our business-in-a-box solutions. Step number one here is get on the Xero platform so together we can examine and strategize over their finances.

We also have a $100 million fund that we provide financing to enable women to grow and thrive.

Laurie: So the Xero piece provides financial visibility and automates a lot of manual tasks.

Ingrid: Exactly. I’ll never forget a meeting I had with Russ last summer, when he started showing me some new things that were coming out at Xero a year ago, which are now out. And I was, like, oh my gosh, this is a dream come true.

Laurie: Yes, Russ, can you give us a little background on how you got together with Ingrid on this?

Russ: Ingrid and I met back in our Dell days, over four years ago when she was Dell’s Entrepreneur in Residence. I was coming out of the venture community and we had a lot in common in the companies that we had worked with and were enabling.

When I came to Xero, I called Ingrid to see what she was up to and talk to her about what Xero was doing. And you know, the mission of Xero was very complementary. Xero is also really focused on helping small businesses to thrive and survive.

In particular, I was talking to her about what we call “beyond accounting” capabilities. Because after we had built our robust platform for small business accounting, we started to integrate lots of tools and an insights engine. We call it big data for small business. Our first foray into that is our business performance dashboard.

Xerocon2

L to R: Cristina Garza, Accounting Prose, Russ Fujioka, Ingrid Vanderveldt

I was talking to Ingrid about this, the ability for small businesses and their advisers to look at key indicators so that they can continually monitor their business and help build financial acumen to be successful. That resonated with Ingrid in the sense that it could help women entrepreneurs easily gain financial acumen.

From the beginning, Xero always touted that no small business should be in business without a trusted financial adviser. Our platform is built from the ground up in the cloud to support a two-way view, for the small business and their financial adviser. Or, as we are seeing, also sometimes their funding agents, bringing a lot of transparency into the financials of their business.

So when I first came into Xero, I think Ingrid was pretty psyched about what we were doing, because I think Xero was architected this in with these needs in mind. So it was serendipitous that we had the meeting, and then it resonated really well for what she wanted to enable within her efforts.

Ingrid: Can I add something? Having full transparency is really a big deal. The main reason I went to Dell as Entrepreneur in Residence was to prove out the concept that through technology we could create an instant global platform and, for me personally, pilot that hypothesis towards the goal of empowering a billion women by 2020.

Going back to what I originally said about our three pillars of mentorship, financial literacy, and technology/scalability, I knew how to solve the mentoring issue. But while I was at Dell, I hadn’t figured out how do we could quickly and easily give women financial confidence.

Back at Dell, I started funding a development team to build out what I call Etch-a-Sketch on top of QuickBooks. When Russ called me and he said, you just have to see what we’re doing at Xero, I got goosebumps, literally I almost started crying because I was so happy. It is dream come true for how easy and simple it makes helping entrepreneurs get confident about their finances.

And to see finances and money not as something to be scared of or intimidated by, but instead, something they can understand and can really fuel success.

This is going to revolutionize small business on a worldwide basis, it’s just that good.

Laurie: Just to clarify one thing. To initially sign up before you start using the business-in-a-box and the Xero component, to just sign up and start getting some of your tips and things like that, Ingrid, that part of it is free. Correct?

Ingrid: Yep, that first level is free, and there are three levels of membership.  The community just went live a couple of months ago, but there are over 8,000 people in it and we’re about to add 2,000 from Iceland. So it’s growing very quickly.

Laurie: Last but not least, the third component, the philanthropic part of EBW2020. What does that involve?

Ingrid: EBW2020 has two arms. One is our for-profit, which is what we’ve talked about. Then there’s the not-for-profit, our EBW foundation, which is focused on the exact same things but it takes it a step further.

For example, a woman in Uganda, if we can give her a working cell phone, get her tapped into the EBW a community, find her a mentor, and start teaching them about financial literacy?

So on the foundation side, we start at a different level than where we start with women who are coming from more developed countries.

Laurie: That’s great to know, and I just want to thank both of you, Ingrid and Russ, for joining me to share this information, which I think a lot of people will find very valuable. Best wishes for meeting your goals, and thanks again.

Unit4 Kicks Off North America Market Focus

unit4_logoUnit4, long-time European ERP leader, is making a concerted push into North America. To that end, it hosted industry analysts at the beautiful 60 State Street Boston venue on June 10. Read my Storify account of the event here.

Intacct Collaborate: Bringing Sales and Finance Together

This video interview was originally posted on SMB Group Spotlight. 

Laurie: Hi, this is Laurie McCabe from SMB Group and today I’m here on the SMB Spotlight at Salesforce’s Dreamforce 2014 Conference.  I’m talking to Aaron Harris, who is the Chief Technology Officer for Intacct.  Aaron, thank you for sharing time with me today.  Can you tell me a little bit about Intacct, who you are, what you do?

Aaron: Sure.  Thanks Laurie.  Intacct is a cloud accounting and finance solution that we have designed for small and medium-sized businesses.  We’ve taken a best in class approach, so all of our resources are targeted at building just what the accounting and finance team needs, the general ledger, payables, receivables.  We’ve got a strong relationship with Salesforce, so if you’re using Salesforce we’ve got a very nice native integration where Intacct and Salesforce synchronize data and processes and it’s a beautiful way to get your front office and your back office working together.

Laurie: So what are you highlighting here?  I know you have an announcement about some new collaboration capabilities with Salesforce.  What’s going on with that?

Aaron:      That’s right.  So at Dreamforce this year we are announcing Intacct Collaborate.  What Intacct Collaborate does it takes Salesforce Chatter and extends it into Intacct so that your sales and your marketing and support people who are using Salesforce today and who are collaborating on Chatter are using now the same network that the accounting team, the finance team, project managers are using on the backend.  So there’s one social network, there’s one collaborative network across the enterprise for the whole organization to work on.

Laurie: Good.  It sounds like that makes it easier for everybody to feed information into the whole financial process.

Aaron: That’s right.  There’s a lot pieces to it.  Obviously there are some great stories, right?  I’m a sales rep, I’ve got a deal that I want to get done, I need to get a 10% discount approved on that deal.  In the old world I’d write an email to the CFO, the CFO doesn’t know anything about what I’m talking about so the CFO has got to go do some research.  She responds to the email, there’s lots of back and forth, none of the communication is captured, right?  So it slows down the sale, it adds frustration, there’s no log to what happened.  So in this world that all happens via chatting and collaborating, and it’s all in real-time, it’s all captured, it’s all part of the record.  We also see this being useful within the accounting and finance team, getting them to collaborate over some of the more tricky business processes.  I was talking to a CFO the other day who said 20% of finance transactions are exceptional, they’re complex.  And we spend 80% of our time on those 20% of the transactions, the exceptions.  We have to find out what’s going on, what do we do?  Having Collaborate allows them to not only more efficiently communicate about these transactions and these exceptions, but it generates a log that you keep the communication around the transaction.

Laurie: I know Intacct is really aimed at small and medium businesses, but that’s a very diverse audience, so what segments of the SNB market are really the sweet spot for Intacct?

Aaron: Sure, so there’s really two categories of customers who are choosing Intacct.  The first is companies who have outgrown their first accounting product, usually it’s QuickBooks.  They’ll outgrow it when they need to automate processes that are manual.  Perhaps they’re now a multi-location business and it’s just too difficult to aggregate or consolidate data across the locations.  It might be that the reporting tools available in QuickBooks don’t give them kind of insight that they need, which product lines are the most profitable, which of my professional services engagements are losing money and which are making money?  This kind of insight is just not possible in some of the low-end products.  Or it may just be that this is a growing company that expects to go public, they need to have proper controls in place, they need to have a certain way they’re going to get through their Sarbanes–Oxley audits, so they need a product that will help them…

Laurie: Even if you’re preparing to be acquired or something like that.  If you sell the business you would need that.

Aaron: Exactly.  You need a product that cannot just assure external auditors that you’re following these controls, but that allows you to provide the evidence that you’re doing it.

Laurie: And that’s about half of your customers are coming from that.

Aaron: About half.  So the other half are people who have embraced the cloud.  They love Salesforce, they love some of the other cloud products.  They can see that with Salesforce they’re getting constant innovation, it embraces mobile technology.  You know what I’m talking about.

Laurie: Yeah, they just want to be able to do things on the fly, they way they want, on the device of choice.

Aaron: And no more headaches about hosting the infrastructure, that’s security, right?

Laurie: No, they don’t want to mess with that.

Aaron: So they want to take their accounting and finance processes and modernize them to the same extent as they already have sales and marketing.  So they’re choosing Intacct not just because it’s cloud and it gives them the same advantages they’re getting through Salesforce, they’re also choosing it because it’s fully integrated with Salesforce.  They’ve got the full front office/back office integration, data synchronization, process integration.

Laurie: It takes the integration headache away too.

Aaron: That’s right.  No more disconnect in the process.

Laurie: So how can a potential customer or prospect learn a little bit more or better evaluate whether this might be a good fit for them?

Aaron: The easiest way is to go to our website, go to www.intacct.com.  There’s a number of things you can do there, but maybe the easiest is just to get a trial.

Laurie: So you do still offer a free trial?  I think a lot of them don’t anymore

Aaron: We do.  We’re very proud of our product, we think it’s very easy to use, so get a trial.  We actually walk you through how to learn more.  It’s actually a really nice way to learn about Intacct.

Laurie: That’s great.  Well Aaron, thank you again for sharing that information with me about Intacct.  I think it will be really valuable for a lot of small and medium businesses out there.  Have a great rest of Dreamforce.

Aaron: Thanks Laurie.

Laurie: Thank you.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 12,661 other followers